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[[EDITOR'S NOTE: Unless otherwise noted, historical items appear courtesy of longtime Nevada reporter Dennis Myers' Poor Denny's Almanac [PDA]. Items highlighted in blue are of interest to labor in particular and seekers of justice in general. Copyright © 2009 Dennis Myers.]]

President Barack Hussein Obama

Sat., 31 Jan. 2009 00:01:55 a.m. PST, 09:55 ZULU/GMT – On this date in 1920 in D.C., Interior Secretary Franklin Lane announced that twenty-four more farms of from 29 to 106 acres were being opened for settlement on the Newlands Project in Nevada; in 1931, federal legislation was approved providing $20,000 for the purchase of a tribal village site, construction of homes, and installation of sewer and water systems for Native Americans in Elko, Nevada; in 1934, Etta Moten Barnett, singer/actor on Broadway (Zombie, Porgy and Bess, Lysistrata) and in movies (Flying Down to Rio, Gold Diggers of 1933) became the first African American actress to perform at the White House; in 1945, near Sainte-Marie-aux-Mines in France, Eddie Slovik was shot and killed at 10:04 in the morning by a military firing squad, the only U.S. soldier to be executed for desertion since the civil war (there were 21,000 deserters in World War II alone); in 1961, Federal Communications Commission chair Frederick Ford reported that $14,650,000 was spent on television and radio advertising in the 1960 campaign ($7,500,000/Republicans, $6,750,000/Democrats, $400,000 others); in 1965, the Van Nuys Valley News knitting column carried a pattern for a three piece spring outfit modeled in the photograph by former Miss Nevada 1959 Dawn Wells; in 1970, Donald Lloyd Swanson of Reno died in Thua Thien province, Vietnam (panel 14w, row 87 of the Vietnam wall); in 1972, it became known that the Nevada Gaming Control Board had been attempting for some time to arrange a meeting with billionaire Howard Hughes in connection with his casino licenses (Governor Mike O'Callaghan and gambling regulator Phil Hannifin later claimed to have met face to face with Hughes in London and said that this meeting satisfied the Board‚s requirements); in 1977, Clark County Senator William Hernstadt introduced legislation to lift the 95 percent rule (under Nevada law then, no public employee could be paid more than 95 percent of the Nevada governor‚s salary); in 1996, the Nevada Supreme Court, ruling on a term limits initiative petition that had already been approved by voters in first round voting, ordered that the portion of the initiative that applied to themselves and other judges be split off from the initiative and voted on separately, in spite of the Nevada constitutional requirement that all initiatives be voted on in the same form in first and second round voting; in 1998, Bruce Springsteen, Jon Bon Jovi, Steve Van Zandt, and Southside Johnny performed at a benefit for the family of New Jersey police sergeant Patrick King (the concert later showed up on bootleg).

Fri., 30 Jan. 2009 06:56:09, 14:56 ZULU/GMT
New York Evening Post (1835): We cannot forget the execrations we have heard yelled out in our streets against Andrew Jackson; we cannot forget the language which has been used by the Bank-Tory press concerning him; we cannot forget the speeches of Senators describing him as a cut-throat and a villain, the scourger of the people, a despot, a usurper. We cannot forget that men who stand well in this community have expressed, in public places, their desire that some arm might be found bold and patriotic enough to rid our country of the tyrant, and avowed the alacrity with which they would largely contribute to raise a monument to the memory of such a parricide.

On this date in 1815, President Madison signed legislation appropriating $23,950 to purchase Thomas Jefferson's library of 6,487 volumes, which Jefferson had offered for sale to rebuild the Library of Congress destroyed by the burning of D.C. in 1814; in 1835 at a funeral in the U.S. Capitol, a painter named Richard Lawrence tried to shoot President Jackson with two pistols, both of which misfired and both of which later worked perfectly when they were tested, in the first U.S. presidential assassination attempt (Lawrence was committed to a mental institution); in 1892, at a meeting at state school superintendent Orvis Ring's office, school principals from around western Nevada made plans for educational aspects of Nevada‚s exhibit at the World's Fair (presumably the Columbian Exposition in Chicago); in 1918, the Esmeralda County draft exemption board was trying to figure out what to do with several Serbians whose origins were apparently in the German "lost provinces" of Alsace and Lorraine and who wanted to volunteer for U.S. war service; in 1933, WXYX in Detroit and several other Michigan radio stations began broadcasting a new radio show, The Lone Ranger, starring Brace Beemer as the ranger and John Todd as Tonto; in 1946, filming began in Reno on Margie, starring Jeanne Crain, Hattie McDaniel and Hobart Cavanaugh (a Virginia City native); in 1957, an explosion at the Titanium Metals plant in Henderson seriously injured two men and ten others were also hospitalized; in 1961, the Protestant magazine Christian Century criticized New York Catholic Cardinal Francis Spellman for doing "his country and his church a disservice" by supporting public aid to religious schools; in 1968 in the wake of a hunger strike at the Nevada State Prison, Assemblymember Flora Dungan said Governor Paul Laxalt was looking for a scapegoat to blame for prison problems and that he'd better get some professional penologists to help; in 1972, as Irish member of Parliament Bernadette Devlin began speaking to a crowd in British occupied Londonderry, British soldiers for no known reason opened fire on the crowd, killing 13 unarmed residents; in 2000, the city government of Reno imploded the Mapes Hotel.

UPDATE Thursday, 29 Jan. 2009, 12:39 a.m PST, 08:39 ZULU/GMT/SUT/CUT — On this date in 1834, setting an ominous precedent, President Jackson used federal troops to break labor unrest by workers on the C&O Canal construction who were protesting low pay and dangerous conditions; in 1910, eastern businesspeople declared their intention to acquire 200,000 acres of land in the Pahrump Valley under the Desert Land Act of 1894; in 1920, Tonopah miners and mine operators agreed to accept a federal mediator's recommendations on issues remaining unresolved after the 1919 strike settlement; in 1946, Reno Mayor Harry Stewart appointed a committee to study the possibility of a joint city/county jail and report back in a week; in 1958, Paul Newman married Oscar-winning (The Three Faces of Eve) actress Joanne Woodward; in 1961, Edward R. Murrow, appointed director of the federal overseas propaganda agency, said that he would try to avoid a strident tone by the U.S. toward other nations; in 1968, Jim Morrison of the Doors drove to Las Vegas with reporter Robert Gover where they were arrested and reportedly brutalized by local police; in 1993, President Clinton ordered officials to draft an order ending the ban on gays in the military (he later backed down); in 2001, Human Rights Watch sent a letter to Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak to call for an end to the Israeli policy of murdering its critics and opponents, set up a commission to investigate those who ordered or participated in assassinations, and make public "all cases of individuals killed or wounded to date as a result of the 'liquidation‚ policy'"; in 2008, it was reported that Israel, 43 years after canceling a Beatles concert because of concerns it would "corrupt" Israeli youth, had invited the two surviving Beatles to perform – but did not apologize for the original cancellation.

TODAY ON THE BARBWIRE
FIRST INCREASE IN U.S. UNION MEMBERSHIP IN 25 YEARS

UPDATE Wednesday, 28 Jan. 2009, 10:14 a.m PST, 18:14 ZULU/GMT/SUT/CUT —

TODAY ON THE BARBWIRE: UAW LOCAL 2162 President Rudy Viola

Wendell Phillips/Anti-Slavery Society, Boston/January 28 1852: The manna of popular liberty must be gathered each day, or it is rotten.

On this date in 1495 Pope Alexander VI gave his son Cesare Borgia as a hostage to French King Charles VIII; in 1859 fifty-foot claims, the first Gold Hill strikes, were located by Alexander Henderson, James Finney (who reportedly named Virginia City), Henry T.P. Comstock, John Bishop, Jack Yount, and perhaps others; in 1883 two Elko County train robbers were captured after a shootout with a posse (the take from the robbery was $10); in 1890 a hundred inches of snow over a period of a month completely closed rail and road access to Virginia City (eight tons of potatoes reached the residents through the Sutro mine drainage tunnel and up a mine shaft); in 1917 after U.S. forces ran around Mexico for 11 months on a dead or alive search for revolutionary leader Pancho Villa without being able to find the ground, the U.S. ended the search; in 1938 the NBC Radio program Death Valley Days broadcast a radio play titled "Nevada's Plymouth Rock"; in 1958 nineteen year old Charles Starkweather and his fourteen year old girl friend Carol Fugate began their vicious murder spree across the midwest that left 11 people dead (these events inspired Billy Joel's We Didn't Start the Fire and Bruce Springsteen's Nebraska and have been repeatedly dramatized in movies like Badlands, Murder in the Heartland, Natural Born Killers, The Sadist, Starkweather, and even the Woody Allen comedy Take the Money and Run); in 1968 responding to a complaint filed by the American Federation of Casino and Gaming Employees, the National Labor Relations Board upheld a hearing examiner's decision ordering some Las Vegas casinos to rehire 42 casino workers, halt anti-union activities, and post notices telling workers they would no longer be penalized for union activity; in 1968 in Bonanza episode 287, The Burning Sky, former Miss Nevada 1959 Dawn Wells made her second appearance on the program, this time playing Moon, a Native American woman married to a white ranch hand; in 2009. nearly two years before the election, the National Republican Senatorial Committee today began running an ad campaign against U.S. Senator Harry Reid, who does not yet have a GOP opponent (the campaign is reportedly running only in Reno and online).

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The Dean's List

   The Dean of Reno Bloggers could very well be Andrew Barbano, self-described "fighter of public demons," who started putting his "Barbwire" columns online in 1996 and now runs 10 sites.

RENO NEWS & REVIEW, 11-9-2006

 

UPDATE Tuesday, 27 Jan. 2009, 6:56 a.m PST, 14:56 ZULU/GMT/SUT/CUT —

Trial of the Chicago Seven/January 27 1970:

Prosecutor Richard Schultz: We ask that you only relate conversations pursuant to questions.

Judge Julius Hoffman: That is right.

Schultz: If you are asked about a telephone call you can tell about it but you can't mix them all up.

Witness Norman Mailer: You are quite right. I have been exposed to the world as a man possessed of a rambling mind.

On this date in 1781 after more than 200 colonials whose enlistments had ended prepared to leave for home and George Washington forced them back into military service, he then forced several members of the group to serve as a firing squad and kill their leaders ("This was a most painful task, and when ordered to load, some of them shed tears," reported a unit physician); in 1829 John Jones, later a U.S. senator from Nevada and a confidant of President Arthur, was born at The Hay, Herefordshire, England; in 1909 a terrible fire in the Sutro tunnel, which drained the Comstock Lode mines, was being battled in shifts by miners, some of whom were overcome by gas and not expected to live, and nearby towns were doing without electricity so it could be diverted to pumps and other equipment (Comstock mining corporations lost half their value on the San Francisco exchange); in 1927 Nevada Assemblymember Frank Winter, an Elko County Democrat, announced that a design by state worker Louis Schellbach 3d had been selected for a new state flag (legally adopted in 1929); in 1953 at the Commodore Hotel in New York City, Ralph Ellison received the National Book Award for Invisible Man, which he called his "not quite fully achieved attempt at a major novel"; in 1961 President Kennedy appointed Edward R. Murrow to be the director of the United States Information Agency; in 1965 Las Vegas labor union leader Tom Hanley accused the Las Vegas Police Department of covering up the beating of a worker, Leonard Blanchard, who had been on a picket line at the California Club for two months; in 1998 President Clinton appointed assistant Clark County district attorney Johnnie Rawlinson to be a U.S. District Court judge; in 2005 a California jury awared $15.6 million to the guy whose photo had appeared on the Taster's Choice label for several years without his consent (he's apparently not a coffee drinker, because he didn't notice it until 2002).

UPDATE Monday, 26 Jan. 2009, 12:04 a.m PST, 08:04 ZULU/GMT/SUT/CUT — On this date in 1564, Pope Pius IV issued a papal bull, Benedictus Deus, limiting theological interpretation to the pope and his appointees alone; in 1848 in Concord, Massachusetts, Henry David Thoreau gave a lecture which would be published the next year under the title Resistance to Civil Government and would later make history across the world, inspiring freedom fighters in India, Denmark, the U.S., Pakistan and South Africa (it is known to us as Civil Disobedience); in 1892, Carson City's Appeal called for replacement of the vault in the county recorder's office, which the newspaper said was cracked in several places and sinking into the floor; in 1912, future U.S. Senator Howard Cannon of Nevada was born in St. George, Utah; in 1925, Paul Newman was born in Shaker Heights, Ohio; in 1936, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation director Elwood Mead died (Lake Mead behind Hoover Dam is named for him); in 1945, the inhabitants of a complex of dozens of concentration camps in and around Auschwitz, Poland were freed by Soviet soldiers; in 1963, Walk Like A Man by The Four Seasons was released on the Vee Jay label; in 1965, businesspeople and some residents on Maryland Parkway in Las Vegas were upset by an Uptown Kiwanis Club proposal to change the name of the street to University Parkway; in 1967, Governor Paul Laxalt said he had dropped prison inmates as staff members at the governor's mansion: "We decided we would feel more comfortable with our own trusted help."; in 1988, Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger of Germany (now Benedict XVI), prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (the Inquisition), visited New York under the sponsorship of the conservative Rutherford Institute and was snubbed by rabbis because of his contention that "the faith of Abraham finds its fulfillment" in "the reality of Jesus Christ" and picketed by gays because of his anti-gay comments; in 1988, the U.S. Coast Guard announced that its north Lake Tahoe station would be one of 43 facilities closed as a result of a $100 million budget cut ordered by Congress; in 1998, (guess who?) said "Now, I have to go back to work on my State of the Union speech. And I worked on it until pretty late last night. But I want to say one thing to the American people. I want you to listen to me. I'm going to say this again. I did not have sexual relations with that woman, Miss Lewinsky. I never told anybody to lie, not a single time – never. These allegations are false. And I need to go back to work for the American people." in 2001, former Reno and Comstock barber Loyd "Dutch" Myers died in the Philippines; in 2005, Christopher Lee Weaver of Las Vegas died in Iraq near the Syrian border.

UPDATE Sunday, 25 Jan. 2009 12:21 p.m PST, 20:21 ZULU/GMT/SUT/CUT On this date in 1787, former revolutionary war officer Daniel Shays led a group of debtors to stop the Massachusetts Supreme Court from meeting and confiscating land and property, attacking both the courthouse and federal arsenal, an uprising that the state militia succeeded in putting down, though the next state legislature granted some of the insurgents‚ demands and pardoned or arranged light sentences for the leaders; in 1877, a congressionally appointed electoral commission awarded the presidency to Rutherford B. Hayes, who lost both popular and electoral votes in the 1876 election; in 1892 at Big Creek in Lander County, a snow slide, one of seventeen in the mining area, swept away a blacksmith shop and trapped miners in a mining tunnel (they dug out safely); in 1920, Nevada District Judge Edward Lunsford threw a charge of criminal syndicalism against Thomas Degan out of court after the Washoe County district attorney and the American Legion's lawyer argued that Degan's membership in the Industrial Workers of the World was a felony; in 1938, Square Pegs, one of the first television programs, began airing on the British Broadcasting System; in 1942, Thailand, allied with Japan, declared war on the United States; in 1959, Pope John XXIII proclaimed the revolutionary Second Vatican Council; in 1961, Bob Dylan went to Woody Guthrie's house in Queens to meet the folk legend, was twice sent away (Guthrie was in the hospital), and finally was admitted to the house where he met teenaged Arlo; in 1965, Nevada landowner William McCall sued U.S. Secretary of the Interior Stewart Udall and other federal officials to force them to recognize 25 Clark County mining claims, known to contain both gold and silver, for which he paid $5,200; in 1967, Carson City fire official Les Groth reported that the Nevada governor's mansion was filled with fire hazards and in need of structural rehabilitation; in 1986, Bill Kraus, San Francisco gay leader and aide to U.S. representatives Phil Burton and Sala Burton, died of AIDS-related complications; in 1988, George Bush wrangled with Dan Rather in a nine-minute that followed a six-minute report on Bush's role in the Iran/Contra scandal, an encounter that Bush later portrayed as the political equivalent of Iwo Jima: "tension city", "I need combat pay!" (a few days later, Bush came in third in the Iowa caucuses); in 1998 in the media firestorm that broke after the disclosure of sexual accusations against President Clinton, NBC broke into the normally inviolable Super Bowl broadcast so Tom Brokaw and Claire Shipman could deliver a false report (a "sighting" of Clinton and Monica Lewinsky in an intimate encounter); in 2007, officials of the Google search engine announced on their blog that they had retooled the engine so that typing miserable failure into the search field no longer led to the White House web site's biography of George Bush, and critics accused Google of manipulating searches for political reasons.

UPDATE Saturday, 23 Jan. 2009 12:12 p.m. PST, 20:12 ZULU/GMT/SUT/CUT On this date in 1879, the Nevada State Journal reported: "Secretary Evarts [U.S. Secretary of State William Evarts] having declared the influx of Chinese to this coast is 'an invasion, not an immigration,' it becomes the duty of every good citizen to expel the invaders."; in 1892, Carson City's Appeal reported that a thousand Danes were expected to emigrate to the U.S. to start a large creamery along the Walker River for which products they had been guaranteed special rates by the Southern Pacific and the Carson and Colorado, and the newspaper also reported that Reno‚s Nevada Creamery Company might acquire the Gould Creamery; in 1919, two months after the armistice, Stars and Stripes in Paris recounted the highlights of some U.S. units, including the 91st Division, the National Army of Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, Idaho, Nevada, Montana, Wyoming and Utah; in 1922, President Harding declared Lehman Caves a national monument; in 1943, facing a hopeless situation after taking horrendous casualties in the battle of Stalingrad, German General Friedrich von Paulus requested permission to surrender and Hitler replied, "Surrender is forbidden. 6 Army will hold their positions to the last man and the last round and by their heroic endurance will make an unforgettable contribution towards the establishment of a defensive front and the salvation of the Western world." (by the time Von Paulus surrendered more than a week later, half his force had died); in 1951, the Elko County chamber of commerce, in a ceremony conducted by Newt Crumley, named District Attorney Grant Sawyer as Elko's "man of the year"; in 1960, Johnny Preston's Running Bear, written by the Big Bopper, reached number one on the record charts; in 1962 Peter Fonda took a screen test for the role of John Kennedy in P.T. 109 and a photo of him in navy uniform and looking emaciated was released to the press (the role ultimately went to Cliff Robertson); in 1965, at a hearing on the color line at Hawthorne's El Capitan and other businesses, two restaurant spokespeople said they were reluctant to serve African Americans for fear of losing white customers and Mineral County District Attorney Leonard Blaisdell said he doubted that anything would change unless state legislators passed anti-bias laws; in 1967 President Johnson's recommended federal budget contained $22 million for construction of U.S. Public Health Service buildings, including $26,000 for a health center at Stewart Indian School and $120,000 for personnel quarters at Owyhee on the Duck Valley Indian Reservation; in 1984, Apple Computer introduced the Macintosh; in 1998, the furnishings of Reno's recently closed Nevada Club were sold at auction; in 2001, the Nevada State Archives and Library opened a conference on the needs of tribal museums, archives and libraries.

Franklin Roosevelt memorandum to Cordell Hull/January 24, 1944: I saw Halifax [British ambassador to the United States Edward Wood, Lord Halifax] last week and told him quite frankly that it was perfectly true that I had, for over a year, expressed the opinion that Indo-China should not go back to France but that it should be administered by an international trusteeship. France has had the country-thirty million inhabitants for nearly one hundred years, and the people are worse off than they were at the beginning.

As a matter of interest, I am wholeheartedly supported in this view by Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek [of China] and by Marshal Stalin. I see no reason to play in with the British Foreign Office in this matter. The only reason they seem to oppose it is that they fear the effect it would have on their own possessions and those of the Dutch. They have never liked the idea of trusteeship because it is, in some instances, aimed at future independence. This is true in the case of IndoChina.

Each case must, of course, stand on its own feet, but the case of Indo-China is perfectly clear. France has milked it for one hundred years. The people of IndoChina are entitled to something better than that.

UPDATE Friday, 23 Jan. 2009 00:02:02 PST, 08:02 ZULU/GMT/SUT/CUT On this date in 1775, London alderman, member of Parliament and especially London merchant George Hayley presented to Parliament a petition from London businesspeople being hurt by the interruptions in commerce with North America, asking that Parliament appease the colonies "to the happiness and advantage of both countries, and apply such healing remedies as can alone restore and establish the commerce..."; in 1862, the Sacramento Bee reported "The Territorial Enterprise concludes that Nevada Territory had been set back fully three months by recent storms. If it be set back only that far, it has no cause to complain."; in 1870, acting on a complaint by a rancher, Gen. Phil Sheridan sent a troop of cavalry on an attack against a Montana village of peaceful Blackfeet (Piegans), supposedly under the impression that it was a different downstream camp of rebellious Blackfeet, an event now known as the Marias Massacre (173 tribal members, mostly women and children, died and the survivors were abandoned in the snow after their village was destroyed); in 1892, Carson City's Appeal reported "Several beautiful views could have been obtained yesterday from the effect of the pogonip, especially that of the Capitol square"; in 1923, the success of alcohol prohibition was on full display: in Gary, Indiana, 67 leading citizens including the mayor and sheriff were either under arrest or being sought for arrest for bootlegging, at the Quantico marine base an investigation of bootlegging was underway at the order of Commandant Smedley Butler, and in Hollywood the film community was a target of a booze and narcotics probe ordered by U.S. prohibition commissioner Ray Haynes; in 1941, the U.S. Army Air Corps leased the former Western Air Express airfield from the City of Las Vegas; in 1958, Maybe Baby by The Crickets was released; in 1968. North Korea captured the spy ship U.S.S. Pueblo (reservists in Nevada were called to active duty and sent to the Pacific for the "emergency") and held it for eleven months until U.S. officials apologized for its spying; in 1973, President Nixon announced an end to the Vietnam war (though the U.S. continued providing various kinds of support such as bombing) and during a New York concert Neil Young was handed a message telling him that (U.S. participation in) the Vietnam war had ended and he told the audience "Peace has come", setting off ten minutes of hysterical cheering and crying; in 1998 in the wake of disclosure of accusations against President Clinton involving White House intern Monica Lewinsky, columnist Ann Coulter said on Geraldo Rivera's CNBC television program that Clinton had also been "serviced" by "four other interns or staff members there", a claim Coulter has never substantiated; in 2004, veteran Nevada legislative researchers Bob Erickson and Fred Welden retired after distinguished careers serving the public, carrying away with them a significant share of the institutional memory of the Nevada Legislature.

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The Dean's List

   The Dean of Reno Bloggers could very well be Andrew Barbano, self-described "fighter of public demons," who started putting his "Barbwire" columns online in 1996 and now runs 10 sites.

RENO NEWS & REVIEW, 11-9-2006

 

UPDATE Thursday, 22 Jan. 2009 19:42:26 PST, 03:42 ZULU/GMT/SUT/CUT 1-23-2009 On this date in 1867, the Nevada Legislature ratified the 14th amendment to the U.S. Constitution, a post-Civil War amendment guaranteeing citizens due process and equal protection of the laws and extending the protections of the bill of rights — previously protections only against the federal government — to actions by the states, thus fulfilling one of the original purposes of Nevada's admission to the union one of the original purposes of Nevada's admission to the union, though the U.S. Supreme Court, to the dismay of Congress, voided the Amendment in the 1873 Slaughter-House Cases (it took decades for later Courts to reinstate the original meaning of the amendment); in 1899, thirty five years after Pope Pius IX made religious freedom, human reason, Protestantism, rationalism, pantheism, socialism, separation of church and state, nonviolence, the authority of civil government, rebellion, admission of all classes to public schools, freedom of opinion and expression, and civil marriage doctrinal offenses, Pope Leo XIII issued an encyclical, Testem Benevolentiae Nostrae, that said Americans were among the worst practitioners: too willing to accommodate doctrine to modernity (change), too willing to think and say what they want and to allow their expression into print (free speech), too individualistic and willing to rely on the spiritual in their own lives rather than through the church (conscience), too bewitched by practical virtue to the neglect of contemplative values (pragmatism), too dismissive of the religious life (initiative), but it is not certain if he was referring to all Americans or just those in the United States, who were also known as Americans (the encyclical referred to "the whole American people"); in 1910 after a school bond issue was approved by voters by a vote of 62 to 4, the Clark County Review reported "Several good citizens have called on the Review and requested that the paper 'roast' the four citizens who registered their ballots against proper school accommodations for the children of Las Vegas; but what's the use? Men who could vote against public school facilities would perhaps not comprehend it, or care if they did."; in 1912. the Carson City News published an account of the alleged November 1911 crimes and arrest of Indian Mike and his deaf mute son, contradicting previous published accounts by other newspapers that portrayed the two as bloodthirsty renegades.; in 1936, Governor Richard Kirman asked Lieutenant Governor Fred Alward to speak for him at the Nevada Farm Bureau convention; in 1944 with victory for the U.S. in the war looking more likely, the 14,000 acre Keystone Ordnance Works in Geneva, Pennsylvania, near Meadville ended its operations, though its 1,530 male and 330 female workers would be phased out gradually; in 1965, actor Ray Walston, who appeared in the Kim Novak/Dean Martin film Kiss Me, Stupid (set in a small Nevada town), defended the movie against harsh criticism for its smuttiness by critics and the Catholic Legion of Decency; in 1988, Reno police officers Guy McKillip and Milton Perry were arrested for allegedly taking a blind, intoxicated man 30 miles out of town and abandoning him alongside Interstate 80; in 1988, James Gritz (rhymes with lights), a Clark County substitute teacher and conspiracy theorist who was under indictment for a passport violation, announced his candidacy for the American Independent nomination for president; in 1993, President Clinton signed an executive order revoking the global gag rule, first imposed by President Reagan in 1984 and requiring that health care organizations "agree as a condition of their receipt of [U.S.] federal funds" that they will "neither perform nor actively promote abortion as a method of family planning in other nations"; in 1996, The New York Times started its own web site; in 2001, George Bush signed an executive order reinstating the global gag rule (see 1993); in 2006, Juan Evo Morales Ayma was sworn in as the first indigenous chief of state of Bolivia.

UPDATE Wednesday, 21 Jan. 2009 15:47 p.m. PST / 23:47 ZULU/GMT/SUT/CUT — On this date in 1522, Adriaan Florisz Boeyens, a leader of the Spanish inquisition, became Pope Adrian VI, the first Dutch pope and the last non-Italian pope until the 20th century; in 1883, Austin's Reveille pointed out that the Nevada Legislature had just appointed two of the three members of the Nevada Board of Regents, which governed the University of Nevada in Elko, and that two of the three regents "are from the western part of the State, from which section not a scholar has ever attended the Elko school."; in 1900, John Johnson, former mountain man and Montana lawman (portrayed by Robert Redford in Jeremiah Johnson) died at a veteran's hospital in Los Angeles; in 1901, the Tuscarora Miners Union was reported to have ninety-eight members; in 1903, over a story about the Birmingham, Alabama, Liberian Colonization Society sending a third "cargo of negroes" from Savannah to Liberia aboard the steamer Donnalde, the Nevada State Journal used the subhead "The Liberian Colonization Society Is Shipping the Colored Man Away"; in 1936 at a chamber of commerce meeting two days after three warehouses were destroyed by Las Vegas' biggest fire, CC board member C.C. Ronnow suggested that police officers spend less time "window shopping" on Fremont Street and more time patrolling the warehouse district, whereupon Mayor Leonard Arnett jumped up to angrily defend the police; in 1942, Count Basie and his orchestra recorded One O'Clock Jump; in 1944, The New York Times reported that because of high production goals, inadequate training, and poor workplace safety, 37,500 war workers had died since the start of the war — 7,500 more than had died in the war itself; in 1962, it snowed in San Francisco; in 1964, during a period of civil rights tension in St. Augustine, the car of African-American deaf mute Charles Brunson was firebombed while he attended a PTA meeting; in 1985, a Galaxy Airlines four engine turboprop, used during 1984 by Democratic presidential candidate Jesse Jackson, went down south of Reno, killing seventy people (one passenger, 17 year-old George Lamson Jr, survived); in 1996, Sharon Stone won a Golden Globe for Casino and Nicholas Cage for Leaving Las Vegas.

President Barack Hussein Obama

UPDATE Tuesday, 20 Jan. 2009 12:44 a.m. PST / 08:44 ZULU/GMT/SUT/CUT — On this date in 1894 Little Orphan Annie cartoonist Harold Gray was born; in 1907 workers in Goldfield, Nevada staged a parade commemorating the second anniversary of the notorious „Bloody Sunday‰ massacre of workers by government troops during the first Russian revolution; in 1920 as Carson City women organized to provide bed and board in their homes for members of the Nevada Legislature, Governor Emmet Boyle expressed his willingness to call a one day special session to ratify the federal women‚s suffrage amendment if its cost could be held down to $1,000; in 1936 Nevada superintendent of schools Chauncey Smith estimated that there were fifty to sixty mentally retarded children in the state in need of special needs assistance; in 1942 in a luxurious villa at Wannsee, Germany, Hitler‚s deputy Reinhard Heydrich convened a conference of 15 Nazi officials to sort out incompatible policies toward the Jews, whether to exterminate the Jewish race or use it for forced labor˜and ultimately how to carry out extermination of all 11 million Jews in Europe; in 1953 Governor Charles Russell recommended a pay raise for Nevada state employees of up to ten percent; in 1958 the cast album for the Broadway musical The Music Man was released, placing on the Billboard chart for 245 weeks, twelve of them at number one; in 1958 service on Union Pacific‚s City of Las Vegas Streamliner train between Los Angeles and Las Vegas was cut from daily to three times a week for $18 round trip which included a buffet and entrance to a lounge; in 1961 at the inauguration of John Kennedy, Robert Frost˜unable because of the glare from the snow to read „Dedication‰, the poem he composed for the occasion˜ recited „The Gift Outright‰ from memory; in 1961 Catholic Cardinal Richard Cushing, speaking a seemingly endless prayer at the dais, had seen smoke coming from beneath the speaking stand and believing there might be a bomb kept the prayer going for almost twenty minutes (while the Secret Service worked underneath) so that if a bomb exploded he and not John Kennedy would take the impact (the Secret Service found the smoke was coming from a small heater and put out the fire); in 1964 Meet the Beatles, a truncated version of one of their English albums, was released in the U.S.; in 1968 the 77-day seige of Khe Sanh began, during which General Westmoreland wanted to use nuclear weapons but was overruled; in 1977 John and Yoko attended Jimmy Carter‚s inaugural gala; in 1986 Martin Luther King Day was commemorated as a national holiday for the first time; in 1988 Khan Abdul Ghaffar Khan, the nonviolent Pathan leader and colleague of Gandhi who converted the fierce and warlike Pathans to nonviolence in their struggles against the British, died in Peshawar (now in Pakistan) while under house arrest and was mourned by tens of thousands who followed his body across the Khyber Pass to burial in Jalalabad, the Afghan civil war halted for the occasion; in 2001 in Manila and Washington the children of famous politicians both became president without winning the public‚s vote˜Phillippine President Joseph Estrada was forced out of office by a second „people power‰ revolution after Estrada‚s allies in Congress suppressed evidence against him in his impeachment trial, replaced by Gloria Macapagal Arroyo, and George Bush was sworn in after losing the election but winning appointment by presidential electors; in 2009 there are 712 days remaining until the next Nevada governor‚s inauguration; in 2009 Barack Obama will take office as president of the United States.

George Washington's second inaugural/March 4 1793: That if it shall be found during my administration of the Government I have in any instance violated willingly or knowingly the injunctions thereof, I may (besides incurring constitutional punishment) be subject to the upbraidings of all who are now witnesses of the present solemn ceremony.

Thomas Jefferson's first inaugural/March 4 1801: And let us reflect that, having banished from our land that religious intolerance under which mankind so long bled and suffered, we have yet gained little if we countenance a political intolerance as despotic, as wicked, and capable of as bitter and bloody persecutions. During the throes and convulsions of the ancient world, during the agonizing spasms of infuriated man, seeking through blood and slaughter his long-lost liberty, it was not wonderful that the agitation of the billows should reach even this distant and peaceful shore; that this should be more felt and feared by some and less by others, and should divide opinions as to measures of safety. But every difference of opinion is not a difference of principle. We have called by different names brethren of the same principle. We are all Republicans, we are all Federalists. If there be any among us who would wish to dissolve this Union or to change its republican form, let them stand undisturbed as monuments of the safety with which error of opinion may be tolerated where reason is left free to combat it.

James Madison's first inaugural/March 9 1809: Indulging no passions which trespass on the rights or the repose of other nations, it has been the true glory of the United States to cultivate peace by observing justice, and to entitle themselves to the respect of the nations at war by fulfilling their neutral obligations with the most scrupulous impartiality. If there be candor in the world, the truth of these assertions will not be questioned; posterity at least will do justice to them.

John Quincy Adams' inaugural/March 4 1825: The forest has fallen by the ax of our woodsmen; the soil has been made to teem by the tillage of our farmers; our commerce has whitened every ocean. The dominion of man over physical nature has been extended by the invention of our artists. Liberty and law have marched hand in hand. All the purposes of human association have been accomplished as effectively as under any other government on the globe, and at a cost little exceeding in a whole generation the expenditure of other nations in a single year.

Abraham Lincoln's second inaugural/March 4 1865: Neither party expected for the war the magnitude or the duration which it has already attained. Each looked for an easier triumph, and a result less fundamental and astounding. Both read the same Bible and pray to the same God, and each invokes His aid against the other.

Chester Arthur'sinaugural address/September 19 1881: Men may die, but the fabrics of our free institutions remain unshaken. No higher or more assuring proof could exist of the strength and permanence of popular government than the fact that though the chosen of the people be struck down his constitutional successor is peacefully installed without shock or strain except the sorrow which mourns the bereavement.

Herbert Hoover's inaugural address/March 4 1929: It is impossible, my countrymen, to speak of peace without profound emotion. In thousands of homes in America, in millions of homes around the world, there are vacant chairs. It would be a shameful confession of our unworthiness if it should develop that we have abandoned the hope for which all these men died. Surely civilization is old enough, surely mankind is mature enough so that we ought in our own lifetime to find a way to permanent peace. Abroad, to west and east, are nations whose sons mingled their blood with the blood of our sons on the battlefields. Most of these nations have contributed to our race, to our culture, our knowledge, and our progress. From one of them we derive our very language and from many of them much of the genius of our institutions. Their desire for peace is as deep and sincere as our own.

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The Dean's List

   The Dean of Reno Bloggers could very well be Andrew Barbano, self-described "fighter of public demons," who started putting his "Barbwire" columns online in 1996 and now runs 10 sites.

RENO NEWS & REVIEW, 11-9-2006

 

Franklin Roosevelt's second inaugural address/January 20 1937: Shall we pause now and turn our back upon the road that lies ahead? Shall we call this the promised land? Or, shall we continue on our way? For „each age is a dream that is dying, or one that is coming to birth.‰ [The verse is from Arthur O‚Shaughnessy‚s „Ode‰] Many voices are heard as we face a great decision. Comfort says, „Tarry a while.‰ Opportunism says, „This is a good spot.‰ Timidity asks, „How difficult is the road ahead?‰ True, we have come far from the days of stagnation and despair. Vitality has been preserved. Courage and confidence have been restored. Mental and moral horizons have been extended. But our present gains were won under the pressure of more than ordinary circumstances. Advance became imperative under the goad of fear and suffering. The times were on the side of progress. To hold to progress today, however, is more difficult. Dulled conscience, irresponsibility, and ruthless self-interest already reappear. Such symptoms of prosperity may become portents of disaster! Prosperity already tests the persistence of our progressive purpose. Let us ask again: Have we reached the goal of our vision of that fourth day of March 1933? Have we found our happy valley? I see a great nation, upon a great continent, blessed with a great wealth of natural resources. Its hundred and thirty million people are at peace among themselves; they are making their country a good neighbor among the nations. I see a United States which can demonstrate that, under democratic methods of government, national wealth can be translated into a spreading volume of human comforts hitherto unknown, and the lowest standard of living can be raised far above the level of mere subsistence. But here is the challenge to our democracy: In this nation I see tens of millions of its citizens˜a substantial part of its whole population˜who at this very moment are denied the greater part of what the very lowest standards of today call the necessities of life. I see millions of families trying to live on incomes so meager that the pall of family disaster hangs over them day by day. ... I see one-third of a nation ill-housed, ill-clad, ill-nourished. It is not in despair that I paint you that picture. I paint it for you in hope˜because the Nation, seeing and understanding the injustice in it, proposes to paint it out. We are determined to make every American citizen the subject of his country‚s interest and concern; and we will never regard any faithful law-abiding group within our borders as superfluous. The test of our progress is not whether we add more to the abundance of those who have much; it is whether we provide enough for those who have too little.

Dwight Eisenhower's second inaugural address/January 20 1953: We seek peace, knowing that peace is the climate of freedom. And now, as in no other age, we seek it because we have been warned, by the power of modern weapons, that peace may be the only climate possible for human life itself. Yet this peace we seek cannot be born of fear alone: it must be rooted in the lives of nations. There must be justice, sensed and shared by all peoples, for without justice the world can know only a tense and unstable truce. There must be law, steadily invoked and respected by all nations, for without law, the world promises only such meager justice as the pity of the strong upon the weak. But the law of which we speak, comprehending the values of freedom, affirms the equality of all nations, great and small. Splendid as can be the blessings of such a peace, high will be its cost: in toil patiently sustained, in help honorably given, in sacrifice calmly borne.

John Kennedy's inaugural address/January 20 1961: To those new States whom we welcome to the ranks of the free, we pledge our word that one form of colonial control shall not have passed away merely to be replaced by a far more iron tyranny. We shall not always expect to find them supporting our view. But we shall always hope to find them strongly supporting their own freedom˜and to remember that, in the past, those who foolishly sought power by riding the back of the tiger ended up inside. To those peoples in the huts and villages across the globe struggling to break the bonds of mass misery, we pledge our best efforts to help them help themselves, for whatever period is required˜not because the communists may be doing it, not because we seek their votes, but because it is right. If a free society cannot help the many who are poor, it cannot save the few who are rich. To our sister republics south of our border, we offer a special pledge˜to convert our good words into good deeds˜in a new alliance for progress˜to assist free men and free governments in casting off the chains of poverty. But this peaceful revolution of hope cannot become the prey of hostile powers. Let all our neighbors know that we shall join with them to oppose aggression or subversion anywhere in the Americas. ... Finally, to those nations who would make themselves our adversary, we offer not a pledge but a request: that both sides begin anew the quest for peace, before the dark powers of destruction unleashed by science engulf all humanity in planned or accidental self-destruction.

Richard Nixon's first inaugural address/January 20 1969:
We have found ourselves rich in goods, but ragged in spirit; reaching with magnificent precision for the moon, but falling into raucous discord on earth. We are caught in war, wanting peace. We are torn by division, wanting unity. We see around us empty lives, wanting fulfillment. We see tasks that need doing, waiting for hands to do them. To a crisis of the spirit, we need an answer of the spirit. To find that answer, we need only look within ourselves. When we listen to „the better angels of our nature,‰ we find that they celebrate the simple things, the basic things˜such as goodness, decency, love, kindness. Greatness comes in simple trappings.

Jimmy Carter/January 20 1977: Let our recent mistakes bring a resurgent commitment to the basic principles of our Nation, for we know that if we despise our own government we have no future. We recall in special times when we have stood briefly, but magnificently, united. In those times no prize was beyond our grasp. But we cannot dwell upon remembered glory. We cannot afford to drift. We reject the prospect of failure or mediocrity or an inferior quality of life for any person. Our Government must at the same time be both competent and compassionate. ... To be true to ourselves, we must be true to others. We will not behave in foreign places so as to violate our rules and standards here at home, for we know that the trust which our Nation earns is essential to our strength.

BREAKING NEWS

UPDATE Monday, 19 Jan. 2009 7:59 p.m. PST / 03:59 20 Jan. 2009 ZULU/GMT/SUT/CUT — Several Reno television stations have reported a strike by International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 1269 against AT&T in Reno. They are part of the Yellow Pages sales staff currently selling the Lake Tahoe book. They are striking because they say sales quotas have been raised without negotiation per the union contract. AT&T tried to break unionization of its Las Vegas sales force last year. The local strike is in coordination with other locations across the nation. Stay tuned.


BREAKING NEWS

Sunday, 18 Jan. 2009 5:40 p.m. PST / 01:40 19 Jan. 2009 ZULU/GMT — BREAKING NEWS: Teamsters Union members on Sunday overwhelmingly ratified a new contract with the operator of the Regional Transportation Commission of Washoe County's RTC Ride bus system. Click here for details.

Mon., 19 Jan. 2009 00:14:24 / 08:14:24 ZULU/GMT/CUT/SUT — On this date in 1898, the Douglas County grand jury was meeting on the lynching of Adam Uber; in 1920, the Reno Congregational Church elected Prince Hawkins as the president of its board of trustees and released an annual report saying its debt was down to $200 and that it spent twice as much for charity in 1919 as in 1918; in 1940, The Three Stooges' You Natzy Spy premiered, portraying a country called Moronica and its Hitler-like leader (this preceded Chaplin's The Great Dictator); in 1953 in Waco, Texas, a three year old girl who was allegedly kidnapped by her baby sitter from Winnemucca "jumped with a squeal of joy" from the arms of an FBI agent into those of her mother"; in 1959 after University of Nevada officials denied a story by campus reporter Jim Joyce that said football coach Gordon McEachron was on his way out, McEachron resigned; in 1963, President Kennedy refused to participate in a cold war peace summit with Premier Khrushchev (Khrushchev had agreed) because Pope John XXIII was the go-between and Kennedy feared the public reaction to the first Catholic president working with a pope; in 1978, Jimmy Carter, already considered the most conservative Democratic president since Wilson, reinforced that view with his state of the union speech: "Government cannot solve our problems. It can't set our goals. It cannot define our vision. Government cannot eliminate poverty or provide a bountiful economy or reduce inflation or save our cities."; in 1993 Fleetwood Mac reunited to perform at the Clinton/Gore inaugural gala (Don't Stop [Thinking About Tomorrow] was the campaign;s theme song); in 2001, Belgium announced the decriminalization of marijuana; in 2009, one day remains until the next presidential inauguration.

Date: Sun., 18 Jan. 2009 00:26:47 / 08:26:47 ZULU/GMT/CUT/SUT —

George W. Bush/January 18, 2001:
But I hope the ambitious realize that they are more likely to succeed with success as opposed to failure.

On this date in 1670, Jewish peddler Raphael Levy was accused of sorcery and ritual murder in the village of Metz, France (he was tortured to death, prompting Louis XIV to require that such cases be brought before him); in 1867, Governor Henry Blasdel informed the Nevada Legislature of the last of several additions of territory to Nevada's original boundaries, this one at the expense of Arizona; in 1919, the disastrous post-world war peace conference of David Lloyd George of England, Vittorio Orlando of Italy, Woodrow Wilson of the United States, and Georges Clemenceau of France, began in Paris; in 1931, Assemblymember Phil Tobin of Humboldt County was reported to have "no bills to present" at the impending Nevada legislature (he ended up introducing the measure that made gambling legal in the state); in 1943, pre-sliced bread was banned in the United States as a wartime measure to conserve steel used in bakery slicer replacement parts; in 1955 in apparent reaction to U.S. Representative Douglas Stringfellow of Utah, who had demanded that the Atomic Energy Commission stop using the Nevada Test Site because it caused clouds of fallout to land in Utah, AEC scientists Alvin Graves and Jack Clark arrived in Las Vegas on their way to Mesquite, St. George and Cedar City (Utah cities that would develop high rates of cancers and leukemias) to assure residents of the safety of atomic tests; in 1958, a group of Lumbee tribe members, irritated by cross burnings and other white race problems, put participants in a Maxton, North Carolina, Ku Klux Klan rally to flight; in 1964, plans for a World Trade Center in New York City were announced; in 1969, Vanessa Gower was born in St. Mary's Hospital in Reno; in 1971, almost 23 months before the election, George McGovern announced his candidacy for the presidency, pledging "to seek and speak the truth"; in 1980, Pink Floyd's The Wall reached number one; in 1985, the United States, which had turned to the World Court to hear its case against Iran for the taking of the embassy hostages, walked out of the Court and refused to recognize its jurisdiction when a case was brought against the United States for its efforts to overthrow the Nicaraguan government (the court ruled against the United States and ordered it to pay financial reparations, which are still unpaid); in 1999, Governor Kenny Guinn proposed using part of Nevada's share of the settlement of lawsuits against the tobacco companies to pay for a new college scholarship program for Nevada high school graduates; in 2003, several hundred people filled the University of Nevada-Reno's Manzanita Bowl hillside to protest George Bush's impending invasion of Iraq; in 2009, there are two days remaining until the next presidential inaugural.

Sat., 17 Jan. 2009 14:28:54 PST / 22:48 ZULU/GMT — On this date in 1893, the U.S. Navy, acting on behalf of sugar planters led by Sanford Dole, invaded the Kingdom of Hawaii, overthrew Hawaii's Queen Liliuokalani's government, and installed Dole as head of a new government (the U.S. went through several years of wringing its hands and condemning the planters’ provisional government but never doing anything to reverse the events of 1893 and on July 4, 1898, Congress approved legislation sponsored by U.S. Representative Francis Newlands of Nevada "legally" seizing the islands; on November 23d 1993, the U.S. Congress enacted Public Law 103-150, a formal apology to Hawaii for U.S. conduct and its impact on the health, economy and culture of Hawaiians); in 1907, Raymond Crowell, described in the press as "son of one of this state’s wealthiest parents, Mrs. T.B. Rickey", married Lucy Davis, daughter of outgoing state controller and Nevada Appeal editor Sam Davis; in 1920 at 12:04 a.m., a Brooklyn café owner was arrested for selling a glass of brandy as alcohol prohibition began; in 1929, Popeye made his first appearance in the comic strip Thimble Theatre; in 1931, U.S. Representative Sam Arentz of Nevada introduced legislation for an assessment of a dam project on the Owyhee River in the Duck Valley Indian Reservation of Nevada, with $10,000 proposed for the work; in 1931, President Hoover’s public lands committee recommended that federally managed lands be turned over to the state governments, a proposal Hoover was expected to endorse and forward to Congress the next day; in 1936, the Hoover Dam payroll guard force was disbanded as the construction of the dam wound down; in 1939, the German Reich barred the practice of chemistry, dentistry and veterinary medicine to Jews; in 1945, diplomat Raoul Wallenberg, who saved 20,000 Jews from the death camps, was arrested by Soviet agents and never seen again; in 1957, a joint nine-county commission proposed creation of what became the Bay Area Rapid Transit system; in 1960, direct dialing on long distance calls began in Bell Telephone Company of Nevada territory; in 1961 in his "farewell" speech, outgoing President Eisenhower warned of "unwarranted influence" of military and industry for purposes of profit (see excerpt below); in 1961, Congolese independence hero Patrice Lumumba was assassinated in the presence of Belgian officials, four months after Eisenhower allegedly ordered the murder of Lumumba (Belgium later issued an official apology); in 1966, Foreign Service officer Douglas Ramsey of Boulder City, an aide to Col. John Paul Vann, was captured by the National Liberation Front and held until February 1973, the longest held NLF prisoner of the Vietnam war; in 1978, President Carter met with Senator Howard Cannon of Nevada and members of Cannon’s rules committee staff on the new year’s legislative agenda; in 1981, forty U.S. citizens residing in Nicaragua occupied the U.S. embassy in Managua to protest renewed Reagan administration military aid to neighboring El Salvador and the ambassador and staff of the Salvadoran embassy in Managua resigned to join the anti-government resistence in their nation; in 1991, the long-sluggish Dow Jones average leaped by 114.60 points to 2623.51 on news that the U.S. had started a war against Iraq; in 1995, renowed Portuguese poet Adolfo Correia da Rocha (who wrote as Miguel Torga), known as the "patriarch of Portugese letters", died in Coimbra at 87; in 2009, three days remain until the next presidential inauguration.

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Monday thru Friday
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2 :00-4:00 p.m. PST
22:00-24:00 ZULU/GMT/CUT/SUT

The Dean's List

   The Dean of Reno Bloggers could very well be Andrew Barbano, self-described "fighter of public demons," who started putting his "Barbwire" columns online in 1996 and now runs 10 sites.

RENO NEWS & REVIEW, 11-9-2006

 

President Eisenhower/January 17 1961: Crises there will continue to be. In meeting them, whether foreign or domestic, great or small, there is a recurring temptation to feel that some spectacular and costly action could become the miraculous solution to all current difficulties.

A huge increase in newer elements of our defense; development of unrealistic programs to cure every ill in agriculture; a dramatic expansion in basic and applied research—these and many other possibilities, each possibly promising in itself, may be suggested as the only way to the road we which to travel.

But each proposal must be weighed in the light of a broader consideration: the need to maintain balance in and among national programs—balance between the private and the public economy, balance between cost and hoped for advantage, balance between the clearly necessary and the comfortably desirable, balance between our essential requirements as a nation and the duties imposed by the nation upon the individual, balance between action of the moment and the national welfare of the future.

Good judgment seeks balance and progress; lack of it eventually finds imbalance and frustration...

This conjunction of an immense military establishment and a large arms industry is new in the American experience.

The total influence — economic, political, even spiritual — is felt in every city, every state house, every office of the Federal government.

We recognize the imperative need for this development.

Yet we must not fail to comprehend its grave implications.

Our toil, resources and livelihood are all involved; so is the very structure of our society.

In the councils of government, we must guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex.

The potential for the disastrous rise of misplaced power exists and will persist…

Fri., 16 Jan. 2009 12:29:15 09:29 ZULU/GMT —

Jane Austen/January 16 1796: At length the day is come on which I am to flirt my last with Tom Lefroy, & when you receive this it will be over. My tears flow as I write, at the melancholy idea.

On this date in 1847, shortly after the United States stole California from Mexico and suppressed an effort by its residents to form a republic, Commodore Robert Stockton appointed U.S. Army Colonel John Charles Fremont as governor (this prompted General Stephen Watts Kearny to arrest Frémont, who was court-martialed and convicted of mutiny, disobedience, and conduct prejudicial to military discipline, but he was pardoned by President James Polk, whose aggression against Mexico and deception of Congress led to acquisition of much of Mexico's territory); in 1877, Virginia City's Territorial Enterprise editorialized on the Comstock depression and said that the end was not in sight: "There is actual destitution in our midst. Men who a short time ago counted their wealth by thousands find themselves overtaken by and standing face to face with utter ruin. Fortunes have crumbled into dust with almost lightning rapidity. But this is not the worst. Our streets are thronged with willing men, pleading for a chance to labor, that their families may live. The large hearted charity that distress was wont to receive in former times is no more. Many of those freely gave of their substance have nothing now to give"; in 1895, former Elko sheriff and county clerk Louis Henderson was appointed state prison warden by the Nevada Board of Prison Commissioners to replace former acting governor Frank Bell; in 1919, S.W. Belford had a draft of a resolution approving the federal constitutional amendment outlawing alcoholic beverages and Nevada Assemblymember Charles Richards and Senate President pro tempore Nealy Chapin were expected to introduce it in their houses; in 1936, Six Companies Inc., the conglomerate formed from several corporations for the Hoover Dam project, settled fifty lawsuits involving workplace conditions out of court for an aggregate four million dollars (more than $51,000,000.00 in 2003 dollars); in 1939, the comic strip version of Superman premiered; in 1945, a "Dance for Democracy" was held in Reno at the El Patio Ballroom, with all enlisted men and women from the Reno Army Air Base and "registered hostesses", whatever they were, invited; in 1949, the Nevada State Journal published an interview with University of Nevada professor Charlton Laird about his new novel, Thunder On The River, which dealt with Sauk chief Black Hawk; in 1961, the Clark County Hotel Restaurant Employees and Bartenders Association met with its national union executive committee in Las Vegas and the national body agreed to seek repeal of the 10 percent federal cabaret tax which had been lowered from 20 to 10 percent after the war; in 1964, President Lyndon Johnson approved covert operation 34A (naval raids against the north coast of Vietnam), raids that provoked retaliation by Vietnamese patrol boats against U.S. ships in Tonkin Gulf, which Johnson then used as a pretext for a congessional war resolution; in 1965, the antiwar play Oh! What a Lovely War closed on Broadway after 125 performances; in 1981, British loyalist terrorists sledgehammered down the door of the home of fiery former member of Parliament Bernadette Devlin McAliskey in British occupied Ireland and shot her in the chest, arm, and thigh, then attacked and shot her husband (British police who were maintaining political surveillance of Devlin did not intervene to halt the attack on the two activists, who survived the assassination attempt); in 1995, an evenly divided session of the Nevada Assembly began with 21 Democratic and 21 Republican members, one Republican speaker and one Democratic speaker, and two chairs for each committee; in 2009, there are four days remaining until the next presidential inaugural.

On this date in 1847 shortly after the United States stole California from Mexico and suppressed an effort by its residents to form a republic, Commodore Robert Stockton appointed U.S. Army Colonel John Charles Fremont as governor (this prompted General Stephen Watts Kearny to arrest Frémont, who was court-martialed and convicted of mutiny, disobedience, and conduct prejudicial to military discipline, but he was pardoned by President James Polk, whose aggression against Mexico and deception of Congress led to acquisition of much of Mexico's territory); in 1877 Virginia City‚s Territorial Enterprise editorialized on the Comstock depression and said that the end was not in sight: „There is actual destitution in our midst. Men who a short time ago counted their wealth by thousands find themselves overtaken by and standing face to face with utter ruin. Fortunes have crumbled into dust with almost lightning rapidityÝBut this is not the worst. Our streets are thronged with willing men, pleading for a chance to labor, that their families may liveÝThe large hearted charity that distress was wont to receive in former times is no more. Many of those freely gave of their substance have nothing now to give݉; in 1895 former Elko sheriff and county clerk Louis Henderson was appointed state prison warden by the Nevada Board of Prison Commissioners to replace former acting governor Frank Bell; in 1919 S.W. Belford had a draft of a resolution approving the federal constitutional amendment outlawing alcoholic beverages and Nevada Assemblymember Charles Richards and Senate President pro tempore Nealy Chapin were expected to introduce it in their houses; in 1936 Six Companies Inc., the conglomerate formed from several corporations for the Hoover Dam project, settled fifty lawsuits involving workplace conditions out of court for an aggregate four million dollars (more than $51,000,000.00 in 2003 dollars); in 1939 the comic strip version of Superman premiered; in 1945 a „Dance for Democracy‰ was held in Reno at the El Patio Ballroom, with all enlisted men and women from the Reno Army Air Base and „registered hostesses‰, whatever they were, invited; in 1949 the Nevada State Journal published an interview with University of Nevada professor Charlton Laird about his new novel, Thunder On The River, which dealt with Sauk chief Black Hawk; in 1961 the Clark County Hotel Restaurant Employees and Bartenders Association met with its national union executive committee in Las Vegas and the nation body agreed to seek repeal of the 10 percent federal cabaret tax which had been lowered from 20 to 10 percent after the war; in 1964 President Lyndon Johnson approved covert operation 34A (naval raids against the north coast of Vietnam), raids that provoked retaliation by Vietnamese patrol boats against U.S. ship in Tonkin Gulf, which Johnson then used as a pretext for a congessional war resolution; in 1965 the antiwar play Oh! What a Lovely War closed on Broadway after 125 performances; in 1981 British loyalist terrorists sledgehammered down the door of the home of fiery former member of Parliament Bernadette Devlin McAliskey in British occupied Ireland and shot her in the chest, arm, and thigh, then attacked and shot her husband (British police who were maintaining political surveillance of Devlin did not intervene to halt the attack on the two activists, who survived the assassination attempt); in 1995 an evenly divided session of the Nevada Assembly began with 21 Democratic and 21 Republican members, one Republican speaker and one Democratic speaker, and two chairs for each committee; in 2009 there are four days remaining until the next presidential inaugural.

Thu., 15 Jan. 2009 00:24:45 PST, 8:24:25 ZULU/GMT/CUT/SUT

Martin Luther King:

 From my background, I gained my regulating Christian ideals. From Gandhi I learned my operational technique.
 My wife was always stronger than I was through the struggle.
 If America's soul becomes totally poisoned, part of the autopsy must read Vietnam. It can never be saved so long as it destroys the hopes of men the world over.
 Laws only declare rights; they do not deliver them. The oppressed must take hold of laws and transform them into effective mandates.
 We will err and falter as we climb the unfamiliar slopes of steep mountains, but there is no alternative, well-trod, level path.
 Through violence, you may murder a murderer, but you can't murder murder. Through violence, you may murder a liar, but you can't establish truth. Through violence you murder a hater, but you can't murder hate.
 If a man hasn't found something he'll die for, he isn't fit to live.
 Who are we? We are the descendants of slaves. ... We are the heirs of a past of rope, fire and murder. I for one am not ashamed of this past.
 A hundred times I have been asked why we have allowed children to march in demonstrations, to freeze and suffer in jails, to be exposed to bullets and dynamite. The answer is simple. Our children and our families are maimed a little every day of their lives. If we can end an incessant torture by a single climactic confrontation, the risks are acceptable.
 Nonviolent resistance is not a method for cowards; it does resist. If one uses this method because he is afraid or merely because he lacks the instruments of violence, he is not truly nonviolent.

On this date in 1844, the University of Notre Dame du Lac in Indiana was chartered; in 1896, amid a newspaper campaign for cleaner government in Carson City, Nevada Appeal editor Sam Davis dared his critics to boycott his newspaper: "The Appeal wants it distinctly understood that any persons whose sympathies are with the boodle gang of this county, will confer a favor on the Appeal by calling and ordering their advertisements out of the paper. The Appeal is in the fight to a finish and we will not consider the fight over until the bribers of jurors and the corruptors of witnesses are wearing the stripes they have earned by their dirty work in Ormsby [County]."; in 1901, two boxcars of Porto Rican workers were sidelined in Wadsworth, Nevada (no one was allowed to approach them) until they could be sent out at night to eventually make connections with a Hawaiian steamer that would take them to the islands to be sugar plantation slaves; in 1929, Michael King was born in Atlanta (when he was five years old his father would change both their names to honor Martin Luther); in 1936, after two weeks of watching an Aurora, Missouri, garage where Barker gang outlaw Alvin Karpis had stored a car, FBI agents took a coffee break and Karpis drove off with his car; in 1943, former U.S. district judge William Hastie resigned as Secretary of War Stimson's civilian aide to protest the govemment's continuing racial policies of segregation and discrimination in the armed forces; in 1953, the messianic U.S. secretary of state, John Foster Dulles, told a senate committee that he favored a policy of liberating "captive peoples", thereby providing a policy framework similar to the Monroe Doctrine for U.S. interference and covert actions that followed around the world in subsequent years: "[W]e shall never have secure peace or a happy world so long as Soviet communism dominates one-third of all of the peoples that there are, and is in the process of trying at least to extend its rule to many others. These people who are enslaved are people who deserve to be free, and who, from our own selfish standpoint, ought to be free because if they are the servile instruments of aggressive despotism, they will eventually be welded into a force which will be highly dangerous to ourselves and to all of the free world. Therefore, we must always have in mind the liberation of these captive peoples." (Dulles did not offer to liberate Guam, Puerto Rico or other U.S. "possessions"); in 1968, five thousand members of the Jeanette Rankin Brigade (named for the Montana congressmember who voted against 1916 and 1941 declarations of war) marched in Washington — led by 87 year old Rankin — in protest against the Vietnam war; in 1971, George Harrison's My Sweet Lord was released; in 1973, Richard Nixon ordered an end to U.S. offensive ground action against Vietnam, but continued the war from the air; in 1990, Luke Alan Olsen was born in Reno; in 1992 at an appearance while campaigning in the New Hampshire primary, President George Bush the Elder inadvertently read to an audience an unfiltered stage direction from one of his cue cards: "Message: I care"; in 2005, during a morning news program on KTNV in Las Vegas, weather reporter Rob Blair referred to "Martin Luther Coon King" and (in an apology for the first reference) "Martin Luther Kong Jr.", prompting a workforce threat of a walkout (Blair was fired the next day); in 2009, Governor James Gibbons will deliver his biennial message to the Nevada Legislature; in 2009, there will be five days remaining until the next presidential inaugural.

Those gentle Moslems by Dennis Myers
Pahrump Valley Times 1-14-2009

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The Dean's List

   The Dean of Reno Bloggers could very well be Andrew Barbano, self-described "fighter of public demons," who started putting his "Barbwire" columns online in 1996 and now runs 10 sites.

RENO NEWS & REVIEW, 11-9-2006

 

Wed., 14 Jan. 2009 17:51:00 PST / 03:51 ZULU/GMT/SUT/CUT 15 Jan. 2009

George Bush/January 14, 2001: Redefining the role of the United States from enablers to keep the peace to enablers to keep the peace from peacemakers is going to be an assignment.


On this date in 1784, the Treaty of Paris, ending the colonial status of the states and the American Revolution, was ratified by a fairly disinterested Continental Congress (it took weeks to get a quorum); in 1868, a stagecoach that crashed at Westgate on January 13, shattering the leg of one stage company worker, finally arrived in Austin with its passengers at 1 a.m.; in 1901, Nevada's presidential electors met to select a messenger to carry their votes to Washington; in 1903, the Nevada State Journal commented on legislation to admit Native Americans to West Point military academy: "Negroes are admitted and why should not Indians be if they can win the competitive examination usually required?"; in 1920, an official of the Nevada Valleys Power Company said construction of a power generator on the Truckee River at the McCarran Ranch would begin within the next few weeks; in 1936, Reno physician John Kilb was being held in Los Angeles for Washoe County Sheriff Roy Root, who had a warrant charging the doctor with an "illegal operation", normally newspaperese for an abortion; in 1942, President Roosevelt issued Presidential Proclamation No. 2537, requiring aliens from Italy, Germany and Japan to register with the Department of Justice; in 1946, Mrs. Leo Pinger of Fallon was notified that her son, Bruce Von Voorhis, had been killed on July 6, 1943, when his bomber made five runs over Hare Island out of Guadalcanal and then exploded on the sixth run (his plane did not return to base but his fate was not learned until after the war from "native informants" and the wreckage of his plane was found in a Hare lagoon); in 1954, Marilyn married Joltin' Joe at San Francisco city hall; in 1970, at the Frontier casino hotel in Las Vegas, The Supremes performed together for the last time; in 1973, the largest audience for a concert in human history, an estimated forty million people worldwide, saw Elvis perform live by satellite from Hawaii; in 2003, a panel of musicians convened by Britain's Q magazine named Arthur Crudup's That's All Right (Mama) by Elvis as the song that most changed the world; in 2009, there are six days remaining until the next presidential inauguration.

Q magazine list of top ten songs that changed the world
1. Elvis Presley, That's All Right
2. The Beatles, I Want To Hold Your Hand
3. Sex Pistols, God Save The Queen
4. Sugerhill Gang, Rappers Delight
5. Nirvana, Smells Like Teen Spirit
6. Billie Holiday, Strange Fruit
7. Bob Dylan, Like A Rolling Stone
8. Run DMC, Walk This Way
9. New Order, Blue Monday
10. Band Aid, Do They Know It'
s Christmas

Editor's note: Who came up with this doofus list?

Tue., 13 Jan. 2009 00:01:57

On this date in 1833 President Jackson
wrote to Vice President Martin Van Buren arguing that nullification was unconstitutional (South Carolina had attempted to nullify a federal law); in 1899 responding to a proposal by Carson City‚s Appeal that Native Americans be ejected from town each day at sunrise, the Nevada State Journal said Carson should first deal with „another element at the capital city more dangerous to the peace and reputation of the town, than the poor Washoe‰˜but neglected to say what this greater threat was; in 1913 there was a fire at the Thanhouser Studio in New Rochelle, New York, one of the notable silent film era studios, and the studio immediately turned it into story material, releasing When the Studio Burned less than a month later, on February 4; in 1931 the will of the late Clark Alvord, postmaster and storekeeper in tiny Nelson, Nevada left 55 percent of his estate (including more than a half million shares of mining stock) to movie star Marion Davies, who he had seen on screen in a Las Vegas theatre; in 1940 Mexican President Lazaro Cardenas, like other Latin American leaders, said the Monroe doctrine does not legally exist, that it is a pretext for U.S. intervention in the affairs of the region and a unilateral expression of U.S. interests; in 1945 fleeing her family members, actress Frances Farmer hid in a Reno movie theatre where police located her and subsequently turned her over to her family; in 1973 concluding an early investigation of Watergate by his Judiciary Subcommittee on Administrative Practice and Procedure, Senator Edward Kennedy wrote to Senate Judiciary Committee chair James Eastland to tell him that the probe had found that „a wide range of espionage and sabotage activities did occur during the recent presidential campaign Ý that at least one key participant [Donald Segretti] was in repeated contact with the White House Ý that at least part of the financing was arranged through a key Republican fund raiser who is a close associate of President Nixon‚s, and that neither the federal criminal investigation nor the White House administrative inquiry included any substantial investigation of the alleged sabotage and espionage operations݉; in 1990 Douglas Wilder of Virginia was sworn in as the nation‚s first elected African American governor; in 2002 The Fantasticks ended its mammoth 42-year run off Broadway with the 17,162th performance; in 2009 there are seven days remaining until the next presidential inaugural.

Mon., 12 Jan. 2009 07:44:59

Anglo African Magazine publisher Martin Delaney: The time has now fully arrived, when the Colored race is called upon by all the ties of common humanity, and all the claims of consummate justice, to go forward and take their position, and to do battle in the struggle now being made for the redemption of the worldÝFor God himself as assuredly as he rules the destines of nations, and entereth measures into the Œhearts of men,‚ has presented these measures to us.

On this date in 1859, The Anglo African, a literature magazine that provided a forum for black writers, began publication; in 1864 President Lincoln designated Arcade Creek as the western base of the Sierra Nevada range; in 1894 Native Americans at Pyramid Lake said that they considered the territory between Wadsworth and the lake were still tribal property since the federal government had never supplied the $20,000 worth of cattle that was supposed to compensate the tribe for relinquishing that portion of land; in 1901 Phillippine „governor‰ William Howard Taft was considering whether to allow Filipinos to have freedom of religion; in 1908 a commission appointed by President Roosevelt to investigate the labor situation in Goldfield, Nevada into which he had sent federal troops reported that businesspeople and the governor in Nevada had manipulated Roosevelt into using the troops to break the mining unions (the Washington Post headline was „TROOPS TO COERCE‰); in 1938 Catholic cardinal George Mundelein, in an address to the Holy Name Society of Chicago, said the church had traditionally aligned itself with the wrong side in employee/management relations: „Selfish employers of labor have flattered the church by calling it the great conservative force, and then called upon it to act as a police force while they paid but a pittance of a wage to those who worked for them.‰; in 1942 President Franklin Roosevelt signed executive order 9019 closing Nevada land to the public and reserving its use to the War Department for an aerial machine gun range and executive order 9020 transferring control of the Tonopah airport to the War Department; in 1945 Major Clarence Heckathorn of Las Vegas (former editor of the University of Nevada Sagebrush) was awarded the Bronze Star at First Army headquarters on the European front; in 1954 Reno attorneys Alan Bible and Bob McDonald and university extension official Gene Empey obtained a ten year lease on the Zephyr Cove Lodge at Lake Tahoe and said they would reopen it on about April 1; in 1957 the Tower Theatre in Reno announced it was exhibiting in its lobby the paintings of Navajo brothers Franklin and Chester Kahn, former students of the Indian School at Stewart, Nevada; in 1960 Reno Police Chief Elmer Briscoe, supported by Mayor Bud Baker, proposed creation of a reserve corps and a canine force, a response to the new year riot; in 1965 amid the usual safety assurances from federal officials, a „dirty‰ nuclear rocket was launched from Jackass Flats, Nevada, releasing a radioactive cloud of debris that drifted over Los Angeles; in 1991 the U.S. Senate came within three votes of stopping war in the Persian Gulf; in 1996 after former Nevada lieutenant governor Sue Wagner said she would not run for the U.S. House because it had become too extreme and uncivilized, the Reno Gazette/Journal editorialized that „the moderates slink off the stage without even putting up a fight. As John F, Kennedy might have said, that is not a profile in courage‰, prompting a flood of complaints to the newspaper; in 1998 Gene Vincent, Lloyd Price, Allen Toussaint, Jelly Roll Morton, the Mamas and the Papas, Santana, the Eagles, and Fleetwood Mac were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame; in 2009 there are eight days remaining until the next presidential inauguration.

Sun., 11 Jan. 2009 12:09:13
On this date in 49 BC, Julius Caesar
crossed the Rubicon River near Ravenna at the head of his army (bringing an armed force onto the homeland was a violation of Roman law), igniting Roman civil war; in 1877 Assemblymember Jerry Moore of Elko introduced legislation to abolish the post of Nevada state mineralogist and turn its duties over to the state superintendent of schools under a new title˜curator of the state museum; in 1901 the Reno Evening Gazette denounced U.S. Senator Henry Teller of Colorado for what it called a „treasonous‰ act˜presenting a petition signed by 2,000 Filipinos, whose nation the United States was in the process of conquering and colonizing; in 1907 Under Southern Skies, a play about a „poor girl suspecting that there is a negro taint in her blood because of vague insinuations by Steve [who] sacrifices herself for her family‚s sake݉, was playing at Reno‚s McKissick opera house; in 1920 in a dispute over plans by state highway officials to put the Carson/Reno highway on the east side of Washoe Lake, the firing of highway director W. B. Alexander by Governor Emmet Boyle was followed by the resignation of a second of the three directors, George Elder; in 1949 United Press reported, „Las Vegas, Nev., whose slogan is ŒFun in the Sun,‚ today was brushing off two inches of snow which fell during the night on top of three inches deposited yesterday.‰; in 1953 newly elected U.S. Representative Cliff Young of Nevada appeared with his wife Jane on Edward R. Murrow's CBS program See It Now to talk about the theft of their car and all its contents when they arrived in Washington; in 1956 U.S.-backed Saigon dictator Ngo Dinh Diem issued Ordinance No. 6, providing for internment of his political enemies in concentration camps; in 1969 the album This Was Jethro Tull was released; in 1981 John and Yoko‚s Double Fantasy went platinum; in 2001 the Pentagon admitted a U.S. massacre of civilians at No Gun Ri, Korea, in July 1950; in 2007 U.S. military forces raided an Iranian diplomatic mission in Arbil, Iraq, in a reckless attempt to kidnap two senior Iranian officials (who were visiting the area to meet with Iraq officials in an attempt to improve Iraq/Iran relations) but abducting five junior diplomats instead, the second U.S. kidnapping of Iranian officials in a period of weeks, leading to the April 2007 retaliatory capture of British sailors by Iran in disputed waters (three of the five Iranian hostages are still held by the U.S.); in 2009 there are nine days left until the next presidential inaugural.

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The Dean's List

   The Dean of Reno Bloggers could very well be Andrew Barbano, self-described "fighter of public demons," who started putting his "Barbwire" columns online in 1996 and now runs 10 sites.

RENO NEWS & REVIEW, 11-9-2006

 

Sat., 10 Jan. 2009 12:47:09
On this date in 1848, Nevada Governor Reinhold Sadler
was born in Czarnikau, Posen, Prussia; in 1892 the Appeal reported, „Frank P. Hill, an escaped crank from the Stockton Asylum, who has been wandering around Carson for the last two weeks with an ax aboard his shoulder, was taken into custody by W. H. Chestnutwood of Reno, and transferred to Nevada‚s Asylum on last night‚s train.‰; in 1905 in U.S. Senate debate on the joint statehood bill (a measure to provide statehood for Arizona and New Mexico), Nevada Senator William Stewart advocated an amendment to protect the interests of Indians and Nevada Senator Francis Newlands supported limits on the land that could be sold to individuals; in 1920 Metal Mineworkers Union secretary Mike Moriarity and Industrial Workers of the World delegate Mickey Sullivan were arrested in Tonopah for union organizing activities under Nevada‚s „syndicalism‰ statute, with Sullivan accused of signing up three new union members (O.E. Stone, Harry Olen, and Rasmus Malde) and District Attorney Harry Atkinson pledging to get every IWW member out of the Tonopah and Divide mining districts; in 1952 in Las Vegas, Nevada Republican chair Harold Stocker made it clear that he disapproved of Dwight Eisenhower‚s candidacy for president (comparing it to running Bing Crosby or Milton Berle for president) and speaking favorably of a Douglas MacArthur/Everett Dirksen ticket; in 1956 Elvis recorded „Heartbreak Hotel‰; in 1964 the U.S. edition of the BBC weekly political satire roundup That Was The Week That Was premiered on NBC; in 1972 Hubert Humphrey (who once said „a wonderful adventure it is!‰ about the Vietnam war) criticized President Nixon for taking longer to withdraw from Vietnam than it took to defeat the Nazis; in 1980 the last episode of The Rockford Files was broadcast; in 2009 the Silver Club hotel/casino in Sparks will close at midnight, throwing 200 people out of work; in 2009 there are ten days remaining until the next presidential inauguration.

Fri., 9 Jan. 2009 08:05:46
On this date in 1866,
the Fisk School (now Fisk University), established in an army barracks in Nashville for freed African Americans, began classes; in 1892 the telegraph line between Tuscarora and Elko, which had been inoperative because of snow, was in working order again; in 1914 in New York, eugenicists were offering a $500 prize to the woman selected to be the wife in a eugenics marriage they were trying to arrange so they could „study the issue of such a marriage‰; in 1923 Colorado Governor-elect William Sweet had himself secretly sworn into office at midnight in order to prevent last minute appointments by his predecessor Oliver Shoup, then was sworn in again at the public inaugural at noon (the secret oath taking was disclosed by the Denver Post in April); in 1946 in the Philippines, the Manila Morning Courier reported that white U.S. soldiers engaged in a gunfight with African American U.S. soldiers and that machine guns and hand grenades were among the weapons employed; in 1947 after the Republican U.S. Senate refused to seat long time racist U.S. Senator Theodore Bilbo because he had invited violence against African Americans trying to vote, Bilbo „accused‰ the GOP of trying to curry favor with black voters and said his forthcoming book (Take Your Choice/Separation or Mongrelization) would not please Republicans; in 1960 racist songwriter („You Are My Sunshine‰), singer, and film actor (Riding Through Nevada) Jimmie Davis was returned to the governorship of Louisiana 14 years after his first term as a reformer, this time as the candidate of the state‚s white supremacists; in 1960 a groundbreaking was held for the new University of Nevada library in Reno; in 1961 eleven days before taking office as president, John Kennedy gave a „farewell to Massachusetts‰ address to the Massachusetts Legislature (see below); in 1979 K Mart stopped selling Steve Martin's album Let's Get Small because corporation execs considered it tasteless; in 1984 John Lennon‚s „Nobody Told Me‰ was released; in 1991 two teenagers were sentenced for the „wilding‰ rape of the Central Park jogger (their innocence was shown by DNA tests a decade later); in 2008 a day after he lost the New Hampshire primary and ten days before the Nevada caucuses, presidential candidate Barack Obama won the most sought-after endorsement in the state, from the Las Vegas Culinary Union; in 2009 there are eleven days remaining until the next presidential inaugural.

President-elect John Kennedy/Massachusetts Legislature/January 9 1961: I have welcomed this opportunity to address this historic body, and, through you, the people of Massachusetts to whom I am so deeply indebted for a lifetime of friendship and trust.

For fourteen years I have placed my confidence in the citizens of Massachusetts˜and they have generously responded by placing their confidence in me.

Now, on the Friday after next, I am to assume new and broader responsibilities. But I am not here to bid farewell to Massachusetts.

For forty-three years˜whether I was in London, Washington, the South Pacific, or elsewhere˜this has been my home; and, God willing, wherever I serve this shall remain my home.

It was here my grandparents were born˜it is here I hope my grandchildren will be born.

I speak neither from false provincial pride nor artful political flattery. For no man about to enter high office in this country can ever be unmindful of the contribution this state has made to our national greatness.

Its leaders have shaped our destiny long before the great republic was born. Its principles have guided our footsteps in times of crisis as well as in times of calm. Its democratic institutions˜including this historic body˜have served as beacon lights for other nations as well as our sister states.

For what Pericles said to the Athenians has long been true of this commonwealth: "We do not imitate˜for we are a model to others."

And so it is that I carry with me from this state to that high and lonely office to which I now succeed more than fond memories of firm friendships. The enduring qualities of Massachusetts˜the common threads woven by the Pilgrim and the Puritan, the fisherman and the farmer, the Yankee and the immigrant˜will not be and could not be forgotten in this nation's executive mansion.
They are an indelible part of my life, my convictions, my view of the past, and my hopes for the future.

Allow me to illustrate: During the last sixty days, I have been at the task of constructing an administration. It has been a long and deliberate process. Some have counseled greater speed. Others have counseled more expedient tests.

But I have been guided by the standard John Winthrop set before his shipmates on the flagship Arbella three hundred and thirty-one years ago, as they, too, faced the task of building a new government on a perilous frontier.

"We must always consider," he said, "that we shall be as a city upon a hill˜the eyes of all people are upon us."

Today the eyes of all people are truly upon us˜and our governments, in every branch, at every level, national, state and local, must be as a city upon a hill˜constructed and inhabited by men aware of their great trust and their great responsibilities

For we are setting out upon a voyage in 1961 no less hazardous than that undertaken by the Arbella in 1630. We are committing ourselves to tasks of statecraft no less awesome than that of governing the Massachusetts Bay Colony, beset as it was then by terror without and disorder within.

History will not judge our endeavor˜and a government cannot be selected˜merely on the basis of color or creed or even party affiliation. Neither will competence and loyalty and stature, while essential to the utmost, suffice in times such as these.

For of those to whom much is given, much is required. And when at some future date the high court of history sits in judgment on each one of us˜recording whether in our brief span of service we fulfilled our responsibilities to the state˜our success or failure, in whatever office we may hold, will be measured by the answers to four questions:

First, were we truly men of courage˜with the courage to stand up to one's enemies˜and the courage to stand up, when necessary, to one's associates˜the courage to resist public pressure, as well as private greed?

Secondly, were we truly men of judgment˜with perceptive judgment of the future as well as the past˜of our own mistakes as well as the mistakes of others˜with enough wisdom to know that we did not know, and enough candor to admit it?

Third, were we truly men of integrity˜men who never ran out on either the principles in which they believed or the people who believed in them˜men who believed in us˜men whom neither financial gain nor political ambition could ever divert from the fulfillment of our sacred trust?

Finally, were we truly men of dedication˜with an honor mortgaged to no single individual or group, and compromised by no private obligation or aim, but devoted solely to serving the public good and the national interest?

Courage˜judgment˜integrity˜dedication˜these are the historic qualities of the Bay Colony and the Bay State, the qualities which this state has consistently sent to this chamber on Beacon Hill here in Boston and to Capitol Hill back in Washington.

And these are the qualities which, with God's help, this son of Massachusetts hopes will characterize our government's conduct in the four stormy years that lie ahead.

Humbly I ask His help in that undertaking--but aware that on earth His will is worked by men. I ask for your help and your prayers, as I embark on this new and solemn journey.

[Speechwriter Theodore Sorenson: "Kennedy the historian was not unmindful of Lincoln's farewell to the people of Springfield. Kennedy the politician was not unmindful of the debt he owned the state of his birth for making possible his public career. And Kennedy the president-elect was not unmindful of his inability to be as proud of all the politicians in Massachusetts as Massachusetts was of him. Few state governments in the United States have a record free from corruption, but in January 1961, few had a record that could surpass the repeated disclosures of official wrongdoing that had rocked his home state. The president-elect felt he could neither avoid that issue nor deliver a self-righteous lecture about it. There had been little time to prepare the speech, and I had reluctantly dipped into our file of phrases collected for the Inaugural Address in order to meet his specifications. It was not a lengthy speech — less than three dozen sentences. But it was one of his best, and it proved to be a moving occasion. It was his first formal address since the election, and to all those watching on television he looked and sounded like a president as he spoke of government as "a city upon a hill."]

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The Dean's List

   The Dean of Reno Bloggers could very well be Andrew Barbano, self-described "fighter of public demons," who started putting his "Barbwire" columns online in 1996 and now runs 10 sites.

RENO NEWS & REVIEW, 11-9-2006

 

Thu., 8 Jan. 2009 09:28:55
On this date in 1811,
a slave rebellion led by Charles Deslandes in two parishes of the U.S. Territory of Louisiana began, but was suppressed and a hundred participants were executed; in 1830 a pack train led by scout Rafael Rivera passed through the area now known as the Las Vegas valley; in 1878 Acting Governor George Cassidy lost his authority when Governor Bradley returned to the state; in 1892 Carson City's Appeal reprinted a Salt Lake Tribune article by Dan DeQuille [William Wright] on the prospects for oil drilling in Nevada; in 1921 after conferences between Governor Boyle and local alcohol prohibition officials, there were reports that the state would shift enforcement from the state police to local police because the state fund for the purpose had become depleted; in 1924 in Illinois, three companies of state militia were called out to crack down on the violent public response to two hundred fifty prohibition raids in a month; in 1935 Jesse Garon and Elvis Aron Presley were born in Tupelo, Mississippi, only Elvis surviving alive; in 1941 as part of his effort to destroy the commercial prospects of Citizen Kane, William Randolph Hearst forbade all his newspapers from accepting movie ads for it; in 1953 the Nevada State Journal reported that Nevada Republicans planning to travel to Washington for Dwight Eisenhower's presidential inauguration encountered difficulties with their formal wear for the occasion: "Most of them found that under 20 years of Democratic administration they had grown fat."; in 1958, civil libertarian Nat Hentoff began writing a column for the Village Voice a column which appeared for the last time two days ago; in 1960 the City of Reno asked Nevada District Judge Clel Georgetta to lift a temporary restraining order against construction of a chamber of commerce hospitality center in Powning Park, the land for which had been donated to the city on condition that it be used only as park space; in 1966 Rubber Soul hit number one on the album charts; in 1967 three Vietnamese villages between the Thi-Tinh and Saigon rivers that governed themselves as a socialist enclave presented such a challenge to the U.S. that a major action ("Operation Cedar Falls") was mounted, with residents cleared out of the villages and into internment camps, the villages razed, vegetation and agriculture destroyed, and the site leveled with 720 Vietnamese and 72 U.S. killed; in 1999, the New York Times reported falsely that Iraq had expelled weapons inspectors, the first of seven times during the year it repeated the lie, only one of which was corrected by the newspaper (the weapons inspectors actually fled Iraq because of a spy scandal — the U.S. planted an agent among the inspectors — and because of an impending bombing attack by the Clinton administration); in 2009 there are twelve days remaining until the next presidential inauguration.

Wed., 7 Jan. 2009 12:04:47

George Bush/January 7 2000:
If the terriers and bariffs are torn down, this economy will grow.

On this date in 1781, Mission San Pedro Y San Pablo De Bicuner was established on Native American land in present day Imperial County, California, without asking the tribe‚s permission; in 1901 U.S. General Arthur MacArthur had several Phillippine patriot generals, who were leading the fight against U.S. conquest, deported from their own nation, a technique previously used by the Spanish occupiers; in 1918 Mr. and Mrs. Frank Oliverius of Winnemucca received a letter from her brother Joe Kubicek, a member of the U.S. ambulance corps, the letter written on „a piece of cloth from the wings of a Belgian aeroplane brought down in Flanders by a Boche [German] avion‰; in 1932 excavations for Boulder Dam tunnels were completed; in 1947 Walter Winchell reported that actress Thelma „Butterfly‰ McQueen was seen reporting to the unemployment office on West 43d Street in New York; in 1954 at Chess Records in Chicago, Muddy Waters and Willie Dixon began working together, and Waters recorded Dixon‚s „Hoochie Coochie Man‰, named number 225 on the Rolling Stone list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time compiled by representatives of the music industry and press; in 1960 at Gray Reid‚s department store in Reno, Bell Telephone Company of Nevada began three days of demonstrations of direct dialing on long distance calls, which would begin in BTCN territory on January 17; in 1979 Vietnamese troops, who invaded Cambodia while other nations dithered over the mass murder taking place there, took control of the capital of Phnom Penh, ending the vicious regime of Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge˜over the objections of the United States, which had helped bring the Khmer Rouge to power with its secret bombing of Cambodia; in 1980 at the White House, President Carter spoke on the telephone for four minutes with former Nevada governor Mike O‚Callaghan; in 2005 Daniel F. Guastaferro of Las Vegas died in Ar Ramadi, Iraq; in 2009 there are 13 days remaining until the next presidential inauguration.

Tue., 6 Jan. 2009 07:02:22

On this date in 1798,
mountain man Jedediah Strong Smith, believed to be the first white man to explore Nevada, was born in Bainbridge, New York; in 1912 in an editorial, Reno's Nevada State Journal argued that Las Vegas had a great future as a farming community; in 1919, former president Theodore Roosevelt, widely considered the frontrunner for the 1920 Republican presidential nomination, died in his sleep at Oyster Bay; in 1933, rumors were circulating that Governor Fred Balzar would ask the Nevada Legislature for a state sales tax; in 1939, the Nevada Tuberculosis Association obtained a copy of Let My People Live, a movie with an all-African American cast including Rex Ingram, Peggy Howard and Ernestine Coles that was shot at the Tuskegee Institute and shown at the New York World's Fair, for showing around Nevada (the film is a warning against the use of folk remedies to deal with TB); in 1941 in his "four freedoms" message to Congress, President Franklin D. Roosevelt gave an unusual presidential admission that the U.S. had frequently gone to war even though it was not threatened by its victims: "It is true that prior to 1914 the United States often had been disturbed by events in other Continents. We had even engaged in two wars with European nations and in a number of undeclared wars in the West Indies, in the Mediterranean and in the Pacific for the maintenance of American rights and for the principles of peaceful commerce. But in no case had a serious threat been raised against our national safety or our continued independence."; in 1950, England extended diplomatic recognition to mainland China; in 1957, United Airlines again cut service to Elko, eliminating east and west bound evening flights, reducing air mail service; in 1960, Reno citizens were organizing against a plan to build the new convention center in Wingfield Park, a large park on Bell Isle in the Truckee River; in 1960, Reno citizens went to court to try to stop construction of a hospitality center in Powning Park, which had been donated to the city on condition that it always be used for a park (eventually the Pioneer Theatre Auditorium convention center was moved to Powning Park, which was destroyed except for a sliver where the hospitality center was built); in 1968, Buckminster Fuller visited Reno for the dedication of the Pioneer Theatre Auditorium, which featured a geodesic dome of the kind Fuller designed; in 2001, for only the second time in history, a U.S. vice-president — Al Gore — as presiding officer of the senate, presided over his own defeat in the counting of the presidential electors' ballots; in 2008 after Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney told John McCain during a televised debate "I don't describe your plan as amnesty in my ad", George Stephanopoulos played the ad for Romney to show that it did call McCain's plan amnesty and then asked Romney "Had you not seen your own ad?" to which Romney replied "I hadn't seen that one".

Mon., 5 Jan. 2009 08:15:08

George Bush/January 5 2002: Not over my dead body will they raise your taxes.


On this date in 1804 Ohio's legislature began the northern practice of stripping U.S. blacks of their post-revolutionary war rights, requiring African Americans to obtain a document certifying to their free status, fining whites who hired blacks without certificates, and imposing a thousand dollar fine on anyone helping slaves escape to freedom; in 1882 President Arthur reserved land in Utah for the Uncompahgre tribe; in 1914 Henry Ford shocked other auto manufacturers by raising the pay of auto workers to $5 a day and limiting the work day to 8 hours˜but he also expected workers to work harder and increase productivity, which they did, taking a terrific physical and mental toll on them; in 1914 a road show company doing Tik-Tok of Oz was in Reno; in 1932 Maurice Ravel's Piano Concerto for the Left Hand in D major (Concerto pour la main gauche en ré majeur), which he wrote for concert pianist Paul Wittgenstein˜who lost his right arm in combat in the world war˜debuted at the Vienna Symphony Orchestra (Ravel's left hand pieces for Wittgenstein were a plot point in an episode of MASH); in 1940 actor William Powell, star of Life With Father and the Thin Man movies, was married to „recent find at the MGM studios‰ Diane Lewis on the Hidden Well Ranch in Clark County; in 1950 after the Nationalist Chinese lost the civil war and fled to Taiwan (Formosa), President Truman˜acting on a recommendation from the Joint Chiefs „that overt United States military action to deny Communist domination of Formosa would not be justified‰˜announced that the United States would not go to war to protect the Nationalists, even with military aid, a policy that led to harsh Republican criticism; in 1959 Coral Records released „It Doesn't Matter Anymore‰ by Paul Anka, Buddy Holly‚s last record during his lifetime; in 1961 on the NBC program Bat Masterson, the episode „Tempest at Tioga Pass‰ dealt with road building between Nevada and California; in 1973 Greetings From Asbury Park, N.J. by Bruce Springsteen was released; in 1981 mountain man wannabe Claude Dallas killed two Idaho game wardens, execution style; in 1993 Carol Moseley-Braun was sworn in as the first female African-American U.S. senator; in 2009 there are 15 days remaining until the next presidential inauguration.

Sun., 4 Jan. 2009 15:57:21

On this date in 1642
at the head of a group of military men at arms, Charles I personally entered the British Parliament uninvited to arrest for treason five members of the House of Commons (who had been forewarned) and, failing to see his targets, he said, „I see the birds have flown‰˜and then turned to Speaker William Lenthall and asked where the five were, and Lenthall knelt and courageously replied, „May it please your Majesty, I have neither eyes to see nor tongue to speak in this place but as the House is pleased to direct me, whose servant I am here.‰ (the English civil war was triggered by the incident); in 1808 Harman Blennerhassett was freed from prison after being acquitted of treason in the alleged Aaron Burr plot; in 1874 Eskiminzin, survivor of the Camp Grant Apache massacre, escaped from U.S. custody; in 1920 Baseball Hall of Fame pitcher Andrew Foster formed the Negro National Baseball League; in 1927 Austin Millard Clark was born; in 1935 Billboard magazine published its first weekly hits list of top selling recordings; in 1935 Boulder dam project workers Ike Johnson and J.W. Pitts were hit with one of the huge concrete-carrying buckets, killing Pitts and carrying Johnson from Arizona across the canyon to Nevada; in 1935 the Reno city council approved a resolution supporting U.S. Senator Key Pittman‚s bill to transfer title of the old post office building and site on Virginia Street in Reno to the city; in 1940 the El Portal Theatre in Las Vegas showed a newsreel of the Tournament of Roses parade that included footage of the Las Vegas float; in 1957 Elvis took his pre-induction physical at Kennedy Memorial Hospital in Memphis (he appeared at the hospital accompanied by Las Vegas showgirl Dotty Harmony and a guard); in 1960 Nobel novelist and French resistance journalist Albert Camus died in a car accident; in 1975 President Ford signed the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act, which became Public law 93-638; in 1987 renowned Spanish classical guitarist Andres Segovia began his last tour of the U.S. (his eyesight was so poor that in Reno he walked off the edge of the stage); in 2005 Barack Obama was sworn in as a United States senator; in 2009 there are 16 days remaining until the next presidential inauguration; in 2009 there are 16 days remaining until the next presidential inauguration.

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Sat., 3 Jan. 2009 18:59:34

On this date in 1833
in a dog-in-the-manger action, the British˜having abandoned the Malvinas (Falkland) Islands only to see them colonized by Argentina as a penal colony˜seized the islands anew; in 1848 Congress, believing on the basis of emerging evidence that it had been misled by James Polk on whether there was cause for war, adopted a resolution even as combat continued declaring that the invasion of Mexico had been „a war unnecessarily and unconstitutionally begun by the President of the United States‰; in 1868 John Harker, president of the First National Bank in Austin, Nevada, returned to Austin from the 1867 Exposition Universelle de Paris; in 1914 Nevada Attorney General George Thatcher, in response to a request from Lander County District Attorney Antonio Maestretti, issued an opinion that a druggist‚s license to fill prescriptions could not also double as a liquor license; in 1932 construction on an expansion of the two-year-old Pair o' Dice casino in Clark County began; in 1945 U.S. Senator Patrick McCarran of Nevada denied a published report that he was opposed to the drafting of 4F candidates and denied that he‚d said he was˜or even that he‚d been interviewed by anyone on the subject; in 1947 at a reception at the National Press Club in D.C. for veterans elected to Congress, John Kennedy and Richard Nixon met for the first time (it was also the day of their swearing-in for their U.S. House seats); in 1957 the old and new trustees of Churchill Public Hospital held a joint meeting at which they discussed whether to reinstate the hospital privileges of physician (and Fallon mayor) Hobart Wray who was suspended after he accused hospital staffers of lax treatment of a premature infant who subsequently died and a grand jury recommended his suspension (the trustees reached no decision); in 1961 three people were killed in a nuclear power plant accident in Idaho Falls, Idaho; in 1964 the Jack Paar Program, a variety program at 10 p.m. on NBC, aired a clip of the Beatles singing „She Loves You‰ a month before the arrival of the band in the U.S.; in 2000 New York Times reporter David Sanger claimed in a news story that the Clinton war in Serbia „largely halted ethnic bloodshed‰ when in fact ethnic bloodshed rose sharply during and after the Clinton bombing campaign; in 2009 there are 17 days remaining until the next presidential inauguration.

Las Vegas Age/January 3 1914/ Overton items: A horse thief was captured here Monday evening by Deputy Sheriff Jos. F. Perkins. The horse he had stolen from Samuel Leavitt of Mesquite was returned to the owner who had followed the thief. He was handcuffed and chained to a buggy wheel for the night and given a bed nearby, but in the night he dragged the buggy to a work bench and with a vice and hammer, broke the chain and escaped still wearing the handcuffs. He has not been recaptured.

Fri., 2 Jan. 2009 08:06:36

Chicago Catholic Cardinal George Mundelein/January 2d 1938:
Our place is beside the poor, behind the working man. They are our people, they build our churches, they occupy their pews, their children crowd our schools, our priests come from their sons.

On this date in 1899 the Olcovich family shut down The Weekly of Carson City; in 1904 U.S. Marines invaded the Dominican Republic and U.S. agents seized control of the nation's treasury; in 1911 Nevada Orphans Home superintendent Joseph Josephs reported that it cost the state less than 72 cents a day to care for the children in the home; in 1940 United Press reported what it described as „startling information, which rocked the capitals of the entire world‰ from its Paris bureau: „Reichfuehrer Adolf Hitler is preparing to step down as German chancellor and eliminate the more radical nazis from the regime݉; in 1960 John Kennedy announced he would seek the presidency; in 1969 rehearsals began for a proposed Beatles album and movie, Get Back, which became Let It Be; in 1983 the Broadway play Annie closed after 2,377 performances and seven Tony Awards, the third longest-running musical of the Œ70's.

Thu., 1 Jan. 2009 21:38:03

William Lloyd Garrison/first issue of the Liberator/January 1 1831:
I am aware that many object to the severity of my language; but is there no cause for severity? I will be harsh as truth, and as uncompromising as justice. On this subject [slavery] I do not wish to think, or speak, or write, with moderation. No! No! Tell a man whose house is on fire to give a moderate alarm; tell him to moderately rescue his wife from the hands of the ravisher; tell the mother to gradually extricate her babe from the fire into which it has fallen; but urge me not to use moderation in a cause like the present.

On this date in 1752 Betsy Ross, famous for something she did not do (a man, Francis Hopkinson, is believed to have sewn the first flag), was born in Philadelphia; in 1909 Barry Goldwater was born in the Territory of Arizona; in 1937 marijuana was made illegal in the United States; in 1939 Eternally Yours, starring Loretta Young and David Niven and filmed partly filmed in Reno, was released; in 1955 on the same day the U.S. government pledged aid to the „nation‰ in south Vietnam that it created, Ho Chi Minh emerged from the mountains where he had directed the successful war against French occupation to appear in public for the first time in many years, at a huge victory parade in Hanoi; in 1956 Sun Records released "Blue Suede Shoes" by Carl Perkins (the record went gold); in 1967 Charles de Gaulle called on the United States to end its „detestable‰ war against Vietnam; in 2001 forty-eight minutes into the new year, the new century, and the new millennium, three arsonists˜one of them wearing a shirt bearing a cross˜torched Temple Emanu-El in Reno.

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[[EDITOR'S NOTE: Unless otherwise noted, historical items appear courtesy of longtime Nevada reporter Dennis Myers' Poor Denny's Almanac [PDA]. Items highlighted in blue are of interest to labor in particular and seekers of justice in general. Copyright © 2009 Dennis Myers.]]

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